Allspice Chronicles

Entertain like a Queen, Think Lean and Live Green! A personal collection of recipes,anecdotes,and good old fashioned advice…

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The Romanesco: Roasted with Garlic, Onion and Almonds

by Danica Waters

Is it a modified American version of broccoli? A Roman Cauliflower? A German Cabbage? No one knows for sure. Only one thing is certain about this almost alien-looking annual: The Romanesco is a fabulous fractal, pleasing to nearly any palate, and guaranteed to grace any table to which it happens to be invited.

First documented in sixteenth century Italy, the Romanesco is a mild-tasting hybrid between broccoli and cauliflower, packed with important vitamins and minerals that support vision and overall immunity. What makes it even better is that it’s FUN to look at, and FUN to eat. Tell your kids it’s Martian food at Halloween, or that they’re feasting on miniature Christmas trees plucked from a fairy forest.   Its mild, mellow, and somewhat nutty flavor makes it equally effective served as crudites’ as it is when cooked ’til crisp-tender and incorporated into other dishes or served as a side.

Here’s a tasty, more grown-up way to enjoy this exotic vegetable.

Enjoy!

 

The Romanesco: Roasted With Garlic, Onion, and Almonds

(Danica Waters)

1 head Romanesco Broccoli/Cauliflower/Cabbage/Whatever, trimmed and cut into sections approximately 1 inch in diameter, larger sections cut appropriately to ensure even cooking
1 large yellow onion, peeled and sliced to 1/4 inch
5-6 large cloves fresh garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
1/4 C sliced almonds
Olive oil
White Balsamic Vinegar, to taste
Salt & Freshly Ground Black Pepper, to taste
Freshly grated Parmesan or Asiago cheese

In large, heatproof saute’ pan, heat oil until hot but not smoking. Add sliced garlic and cook until pale golden brown. Add onion slices and cook until soft and translucent; add Romanesco, White Balsamic Vinegar to taste, and 2 Tbsp water. Reduce heat, cover and cook until Romanesco is crisp-tender, approximately 7 minutes, or until it has reached desired texture. (Be careful not to overcook – it turns to mush and isn’t as palatable!) While Romanesco is cooking, preheat your broiler.

Remove from heat and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Sprinkle with almonds and grated Parmesan or Asiago; place pan, uncovered, under broiler until cheeses have melted and turned golden brown.

Serve immediately.

(Serves 4)

Posted September 26th, 2011.

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The Ultimate Sour Cream Zucchini Bread

by Danica Waters (image courtesy of www.allrecipes.com)


Several years ago,  a coworker of mine introduced me to the best banana bread I have ever, ever tasted.  She said the secret ingredient was sour cream.  While my mom’s recipe for zucchini bread was already fantastic, I decided to try my hand at adding a bit of sour cream to the recipe.  The results were even more  fantastic.

Preparing for a school bake sale, I decided to make this sweetbread truly decadent,  so I added chocolate chips and dried cranberries and made mini-loaves.  I ended up having to make a second batch, as two of the mini loaves “mysteriously” disappeared when the kids came home from school.   The loaves sold out fast; they look beautiful studded with ruby-colored cranberries and chocolate chunks, and they taste even better!

Note:  if you’re making zucchini bread for a bake sale, be  sure to leave out the nuts from half of the recipe and label accordingly!  There’s lots of folks with allergies and aversions  to nuts out there…

Enjoy!

 

The Ultimate Sour Cream- Zucchini Bread

3 large eggs, beaten

2 C sugar

1 C vegetable oil

1 tsp vanilla extract

2 C grated zucchini

3 C  flour

1 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp salt

1 tsp soda

1/4 tsp baking powder

1/2 C dairy  sour cream

1  C chocolate chips

1 C dried cranberries

1 C chopped nuts (walnuts or pecans work well)

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.  Grease and flour two 9 x 3 x 5 loaf pans, mini loaf pans, or line muffin tins with paper liners, set aside.

In medium bowl, combine flour, cinnamon, salt, soda, and baking powder; mix well using wire whisk and set aside.

In large mixing bowl, combine sugar, eggs, oil, and vanilla.  Add grated zucchini and stir well.  Add dry ingredients a bit at a time, alternating with the sour cream; add desired nuts, cranberries and chocolate chips.

Pour into prepared baking pans.  Larger loaf pans should take approximately 60-65 minutes to bake at 350 degrees F, while baking time for mini loaves and muffins should be scaled down.  Bread is done when a pick inserted in the center comes out clean.

 

Note:  Use up that zucchini!  This sweetbread freezes exceptionally well, and is great to share with neighbors, teachers, and friends!

Posted September 2nd, 2011.

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Zucchini: Grilled and Stuffed Southwestern-Style

by Danica Waters

After spending a happy, busy weekend experimenting with different variations of stuffed grilled zucchini (so far I’ve done it Italian-style, Asian-style, and with green chiles and Parmesan cheese – yum!), this variation nearly got me a standing ovation.  Folks were placing dibs on leftovers for lunch the next day.

 

The secret ingredient is the tequila in the marinade.  It gets ‘em every time; it deepens the flavors and mingles well with all things grilled.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

Zucchini:  Grilled and Stuffed Southwestern-Style

 

4 medium-sized Zucchini

 

Marinade:

¼ C extra-virgin olive oil

1 Tbsp chili powder

Kosher Salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 Tbsp tequila

2 Tbsp fresh lime juice

 

 

Filling:

1 – 15 oz can black beans

½ red bell pepper, seeds removed, cut to ¼” dice

2-3 diced green onions

1 ear fresh corn, kernels removed from the cob

½ C cold cooked jasmine rice

4 oz cream cheese, softened

1 tsp whole cumin seed

2 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro

½ C shredded Monterrey Jack cheese

1 fresh jalapeno, ribs and seeds removed, finely minced

 

 

 

 

 

Trim ends from each zucchini; cut in half on the bias (crosswise).  Cut each zucchini section in half lengthwise.  Using a teaspoon, scrape seeds and pulp from the center of each zucchini section, leaving about a quarter-inch border on all sides.  Marinate zucchini in tequila mixture; set aside.

 

Heat grill to medium.

 

In a small sauté pan, sauté minced jalapeno with diced red pepper in a bit of olive oil until soft.  Add cumin seed, allow to cook for a minute to release the flavor of the cumin, and remove from the heat.

 

In a medium bowl, combine filling ingredients with peppers and cumin and mix well.  Fill zucchini sections; drizzle any remaining marinade over each stuffed zucchini section.  Grill zucchini 3-5 minutes, or until bottoms are lightly charred and cheeses are thoroughly melted; remove from grill and arrange on serving platter.

 

Allow zucchini to rest another five minutes before serving.

 

Enjoy!

Posted September 1st, 2011.

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Zucchini: Grilled and Stuffed Green Chile Parmesan

by Danica Waters

Based on a recipe for squash casserole handed down from my Nana, this version of stuffed grilled zucchini features a surprisingly delicious combination of flavors.  It makes a perfect side dish.

 

Enjoy!

 

Zucchini:  Grilled and Stuffed Green Chile Parmesan

 

4 medium zucchini

Olive oil and salt and pepper to marinate zucchini

 

½ C cooked jasmine rice

1 medium onion, diced.

1 small yellow crookneck squash, diced

¼ tsp fresh minced oregano

1 small can diced green chiles

2 Tbsp heavy cream

1/2 C shredded Parmesan cheese

Kosher Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Olive Oil to bind mixture

 

Trim ends from each zucchini; cut in half on the bias (crosswise).  Cut each zucchini section in half lengthwise.  Using a teaspoon, scrape seeds and pulp from the center of each zucchini section, leaving about a quarter-inch border on all sides.  Marinate zucchini with olive oil and a sprinkling of salt and pepper; set aside.

 

Heat grill to medium.

 

Saute onion until soft and translucent; add yellow squash and oregano and cook until crisp tender.  Add green chiles, heavy cream, and jasmine rice; cook until mixture is heated through; remove from heat. Season to taste with Kosher Salt and freshly ground black pepper.

 

Fill the cavity of each zucchini with rice mixture. Grill zucchini 3-5 minutes, or until bottoms are lightly charred and cheese is thoroughly melted; remove from grill and arrange on serving platter.

 

Allow zucchini to rest another five minutes before serving.

 

Enjoy!

 

Posted August 31st, 2011.

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Zucchini: Stuffed and Grilled Asian-Style

by Danica Waters

Smitten with the results of my first spontaneous attempt at grilling stuffed zucchini (see Zucchini; Grilled and Stuffed Italian Style), I excitedly devoted the rest of my weekend towards developing several variations on the theme.  You would think “la familia” would be picketing outside with large signs that read “SQUASH THE SQUASH” or “IT’S X-NAY THE ZUCCHINI DAY”, but surprisingly, that’s not what happened.  Because zucchini has a relatively neutral flavor, it acts as a nearly perfect culinary canvas for all sorts of world cuisine.

 

Today’s variation has an Asian flare; the flavors and textures on this little gem will set your taste buds on fire. (Or was it the chili sauce?) It’s my personal favorite; I think I could live on this variation, like, forever..

 

Enjoy!

 

Asian Grilled Stuffed Zucchini

 

4 medium-sized Zucchini

 

Marinade:

2 Tbsp chili sauce

2 Tbsp soy sauce

2 Tbsp dark brown sugar

 

Filling:

1/2 small can diced water chestnuts

½ C diced roasted and salted peanuts

¼ C chopped fresh cilantro

½ C cold cooked jasmine rice

3-4 chopped green onions

Chinese Chicken Salad dressing or other Asian-style dressing ( I use Trader Joe’s Spicy Thai Peanut Dressing) to bind.

 

 

 

Trim ends from each zucchini; cut in half on the bias (crosswise).  Cut each zucchini section in half lengthwise.  Using a teaspoon, scrape seeds and pulp from the center of each zucchini section, leaving about a quarter-inch border on all sides.  Marinate zucchini in chili sauce mixture; set aside.

 

Heat grill to medium.

 

In a medium bowl, combine filling ingredients and mix well.  Fill zucchini sections; drizzle any remaining marinade over each stuffed zucchini section.  Grill zucchini 3-5 minutes, or until bottoms are lightly charred; remove from grill and arrange on serving platter.

 

Allow zucchini to rest another five minutes before serving.

 

Enjoy!

 

Posted August 30th, 2011.

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Zucchini: Stuffed & Grilled Italian-Style

by Danica Waters (photo courtesy of www.buckcooks.com)

The end of summer quickly approaches, and gardeners across the Northern Hemisphere are getting the first tastes of their soon-to-be-overly-prolific zucchini vines. 

 

While this versatile garden favorite is an old stand-by in stir-fry dishes, minestrone soups, and of course, sweetbread, I must admit I have discovered a new all-time favorite way to adore zucchini: 

Grilled and Stuffed. 

I have recently discovered that zucchini, filled with fresh, flavorful ingredients and ever-so-slightly charred, takes on an entirely different persona;  it is smoky, delicious, and wonderful warm or cold. 

 

This week The Allspice Chronicles will happily feature four variations of Grilled Stuffed Zucchini.  They’re terrific for buffet tables and lunchboxes alike; I hope you find them as addictive as I do.

 

Enjoy!

 

Zucchini:  Grilled and Stuffed Italian-Style

 

6 medium-sized Zucchini

Italian dressing or olive oil and salt and pepper to marinate zucchini

 

½ C dry bread crumbs (substitute gluten free bread crumbs if desired)

2-3 fresh Roma tomatoes, seeds removed and diced to ¼ inch.

2-3 diced green onions

1 Tbsp fresh minced parsley

2 tsp fresh minced oregano

1/3 C shredded Parmesan

1/3 C shredded mozzarella

Kosher Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Olive Oil to bind mixture

 

(Note:  To make a heartier version of this little gem, add some cooked Italian Sausage or Italian-seasoned Vegetarian Crumbles to the filling mixture.)

 

 

Trim ends from each zucchini; cut in half on the bias (crosswise).  Cut each zucchini section in half lengthwise.  Using a teaspoon, scrape seeds and pulp from the center of each zucchini section, leaving about a quarter-inch border on all sides.  Marinate zucchini with your favorite Italian dressing or simply coat with olive oil and a sprinkling of salt and pepper; set aside.

 

Heat grill to medium.

 

In a medium bowl, combine diced tomato, diced green onion, oregano, parsley, bread crumbs, shredded mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses, and olive oil.  Fill the cavity of each zucchini with bread crumb mixture.  Drizzle any remaining marinade over each stuffed zucchini section.  Grill zucchini 3-5 minutes, or until bottoms are lightly charred and cheeses are thoroughly melted; remove from grill and arrange on serving platter.

 

Allow zucchini to rest another five minutes before serving.

 

Enjoy!

Posted August 29th, 2011.

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The Basic Crepe

by Danica Waters

I used to regard crepes as delicious somethings reserved for fancy-schmancy breakfasts on special occasions.  But then out of sheer crazy coincidence, on one of those mornings when alarm clocks don’t sound and shoes go missing and homework is seemingly scattered to the four winds, I discovered that leftover crepes are actually very practical, transportable friends to frantic moms.  They can be filled with whatever you happen to have around:  fresh fruit and cottage cheese, a smear of cream cheese with a bit of jam, or rolled up with a slice of turkey ham and a bit of cheese… Rolled up burrito-style, crepes can be easily eaten in the car with minimal mess, which makes them an even more attractive early morning solution.

 

When you take the time to make them (and they do take time), make a triple batch.  They freeze beautifully; just be sure to wrap each batch well in waxed paper and foil.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

The Basic Crepe

 

¾ C all-purpose flour, sifted

½ tsp salt

1 tsp double-acting baking powder

2 Tbsp confectioner’s sugar

 

Sift all dry ingredients together.  In separate bowl, combine:

 

2 beaten eggs

2/3 C milk

1/3 C water

¼ tsp vanilla

Zest of ½ lemon

 

Add moist ingredients to dry ingredients, and with a few strokes, mix the ingredients together.  Do not overbeat the batter – lumps will take care of themselves.  Optimally, allow the batter to rest overnight in the refrigerator.

 

Heat a small frying pan or crepe pan over medium heat;  the pan will be ready when a drop of water sizzles and dances on the surface of the pan.

 

Dip a section of paper towel in cooking oil and quickly sweep it over the hot pan.  Using a small measuring cup (about 1/3 C or ¼ C will usually turn out the perfect crepe), measure batter into the center of the pan; swirl batter until it coats the bottom of the pan evenly.  Cook until crepe starts to pull away or can be released from the sides of the pan.  Flip crepe and cook for a few seconds to set any uncooked batter; remove from pan and keep warm.

 

 

Posted August 26th, 2011.

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Nana’s Rhubarb Butter Crunch: Fresh From The Pucker Patch

by Danica Waters

 

Tucked behind rough, twisted twin scrub oaks that supported a rainbow-colored Mexican hammock we rarely, if ever, used lay a shady secret garden best referred to as the “Pucker Patch”.  While the rest of our childhood yard turned out buckets of sweet, delicious things like raspberries and wild strawberries, the edibles that grew in the Pucker Patch were dedicated to a different sort of taste sensation;  if you’ve ever tasted wild gooseberries, currants, chokecherries, and especially rhubarb, you will know and understand that taste sensation to be a truly mouth-puckering experience.

 

As much as we children would have liked to use the hammock more frequently, the stinging nettles fought us for the turf and ultimately won until my mother, armed with a weed whacker, reclaimed that area of the yard.   Of course, with reclamation came unrestricted access to the  “Pucker Patch”, and we’d get to harvest armfuls of bright red rhubarb.

 

This is my Nana’s recipe for Rhubarb Butter Crunch.  The ingredients are simple; it is exceptionally easy to make, and is so delicious that my son requested I make this in lieu of a cake for his birthday.

 

Enjoy!

 

Nana’s Rhubarb Butter Crunch

 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  In a large bowl, combine:

 

4 C fresh or frozen rhubarb

1-1/2 C sugar

3 Tbsp flour

 

Place mixture in greased 7”x11” pan, distributing evenly across the bottom.

In another bowl, combine:

 

1 C brown sugar

1 C flour

1 C rolled oats

½ C butter

 

With pastry blender or two knives used scissors-fashion, cut until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.  Sprinkle evenly over the rhubarb mixture.

 

Bake 40 minutes or until bubbly and golden brown.  If desired, serve warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, or drizzled with unsweetened heavy cream or half-and-half.

 

 

 

 

Posted August 19th, 2011.

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Camille Glenn’s Golden Cointreau Cake

by Danica Waters

 

This is one of the most fantastic and truly unusual cakes I’ve ever made.  Having contemplated this recipe again and again over the last five years or so, I finally decided that an occasion such as my daughter’s 23rd birthday would warrant the labor involved.  Honestly, the cake turned out to be surprisingly easy to make; it was just very different from anything I’d done before.

 

The recipe was created by the late Camille Glenn (Queen of Southern Cuisine) when she catered debutante parties and weddings in Louisville.  The passage that hooked me can be found in her cookbook The Heritage of Southern Cooking, where she writes:

 

“This cake holds a secret all to itself – a magical formula that will fool you.  The texture is unusually moist, tender, and diaphanous.  This delicacy in contrast to the elusive, rich frosting sets the cake apart.  It is a gala occasion cake.  In fact, if the occasion is not gala, the cake will make it so.  You’ll see.”

 

She was right.  It’s almost like an ethereal combination of an angel food cake and a pound cake; it’s light as a feather but incredibly moist like a sponge cake.

 

With this recipe, Camille provides two options for frosting the cake; one is a bit heavier on the Cointreau, and the other is more a classic buttercream.  I chose the first option and it was wonderful.  I must advise, however, that the frosting is very strong, and is actually better when allowed to rest overnight in the refrigerator.  The resting time not only allowed the sharpness of the Cointreau to mellow a bit,  it also seemed to enhance the overall texture of the cake.

 

Enjoy!

 

Camille Glenn’s Golden Cointreau Cake

(from the Heritage of Southern Cooking)

 

8 large eggs

1-1/2 C sugar

1/3 C fresh orange juice

1 C all purpose flour

1-1/2 tsp Cointreau

½ tsp vanilla extract

¼ tsp salt

½ tsp cream of tartar

Cointreau Frosting or Classic Buttercream with Cointreau (recipe follows)

 

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

 

Separate the eggs.  Put the yolks in one large mixing bowl and the whites in another large mixing bowl.

 

Beat the egg yolks with an electric mixer until they have thickened and are smooth.  Beat in the sugar slowly, then continue beating until the mixture turns a lighter shade of yellow and is smooth.  Add the orange juice and blend thoroughly.

 

Measure the flour, then sift it twice.  Sprinkle the sifted flour over the egg yolk mixture and gently fold it in by hand with a whisk or a rubber spatula, or with the electric mixer on a very low speed.  Fold in the Cointreau and vanilla.

 

Add the salt to the egg whites and beat until they begin to turn white and foamy.  Add the cream of tartar, and continue to beat until the egg whites hold a stiff peak but are not dry and grainy, about 4 minutes more.

 

Fold a few spoonfuls of the egg whites into the batter to lighten it.  Then add the remaining egg whites to the batter, gently folding them in.

 

Spoon the batter into a 10 x 4-1/2 inch angel food cake pan (a tube pan with a removable bottom)  The pan should be no more than three quarters full.

 

Place the cake pan on the middle shelf of the oven and bake until a cake tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean, or until the cake springs back at once when lightly touched, about 1-1/4 hours.

 

Remove the cake from the oven, turn it upside down on the tube pan legs, and allow it to rest overnight before frosting.

 

Loosen the cake with a thin sharp knife, and unmold it.  Put the cake on a plate or on a flat surface covered with wax paper or foil.  Spread the frosting over the cake.

 

Cointreau Frosting  (*** I used this frosting***)

 

8 Tbsp unsalted butter, cut into pieces

2-3/4 C confectioner’s sugar sifted

1/8 tsp salt

1 large egg yolk

6-8 Tbsp Cointreau or more as needed

 

Put the butter in a large mixing bowl.  Add the confectioners’ sugar and salt.  Beat well with an electric mixer.  Add the egg yolk, then slowly add 6 Tbsp of the Cointreau.  Continue to beat the frosting until it is smooth, thick, and pliable, 3 minutes.  Add more Cointreau as needed; it usually takes 8 Tbsp.  This frosting must be thick.

 

Frost the cake generously in a swirl design.  Allow the frosting to firm for 30 minutes, then lift the cake to a serving platter.  Keep cake refrigerated.

 

 

Classic Buttercream with Cointreau

 

1 C (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into pieces

5 large egg yolks

2/3 C sugar

¼ tsp cream of tartar

1/8 tsp salt, or to taste

5 Tbsp cold water

3 Tbsp Cointreau

 

Cream the butter until it is light and smooth; set aside.

 

Beat the egg yolks with an electric mixer until they have doubled in bulk, 3 minutes.

 

Combine the sugar, cream of tartar, salt, and water ini a heavy saucepan, bring to a boil, and cook over medium heat until the syrup spins a thread when it falls from a wooden spoon or until a candy thermometer registers 235-236 degrees F.  (If the syrup is not cooked to this point, the frosting will never firm up.)

 

Immediately pour the hot syrup in a steady stream into the egg yolks, beating constantly.  Continue to beat until the mixture has cooled, 15 – 20 minutes.

 

Add the butter to the yolk mixture a tablespoonful at a time.  If the frosting should look curdled while you are adding the butter, place the frosting over hot (not boiling) water and beat vigorously until it is smooth again.  Add the Cointreau and mix thoroughly.  If necessary, chill the frosting until it has a good spreading consistency, 35-45 minutes.

 

Frost the cake generously in a beautiful swirling design, and then keep the cake refrigerated.

Posted August 17th, 2011.

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Brandied Pears

by Danica Waters / image courtesy of wikipedia.com

Don’t forget:  tomorrow is National Can-It-Forward Day!  If you haven’t already signed up for the live webcast coming from Seattle’s Pike Place Market, you can sign up here.

Be sure to check out the schedule of events – there’s a great lineup of recipes, tips and tricks ready and waiting on Canning Across America’s website, as well.

 

At 25 cents a pound, there was no way I could pass up the opportunity to try this recipe.  Like the Kentucky Bourbon Peaches featured yesterday, Brandied Pears are deliciously elegant served warm over vanilla ice cream or left all to themselves.  Try adding the leftover brandied syrup to a white wine spritzer, or simply pour over ice cubes and top with soda or mineral water.

Happy Canning!

Enjoy!

 

Brandied Pears

(from the Bernardin Guide to Home Preserving)

6 lb pears

2 lemons

1-1/2 C water

2-1/2 C sugar

1 piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and thinly sliced

1-1/2 C brandy

 

Fill boiling water canner with water.  Place 6 clean pint jars in canner over high heat.  Bring to a rolling boil; reduce heat and keep jars hot until ready to use.

In separate saucepan, place lids in hot but not boiling water; keep hot until ready to use.

Peel, halve, and core pears;  place in color protection solution (1/4 C lemon juice to 4 C water) and set aside.

With vegetable peeler, remove rind (yellow part only) from lemons in continuous spiral.  Squeeze juice from lemons and strain into measuring cup; add sufficient water to make 2 cups.

In a large stainless steel or enamel saucepan, combine water, rind, juice, sugar, and gingerroot.  Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Drain pears and add to hot liquid; heat to a boil.

Pack hot fruit snugly in overlapping layers in hot jar to within 3/4 of an inch of top rim.  Pour 1/4 C brandy over pears in jar.  Add boiling syrup to cover pears to within 1/2 inch of top rim (head space).  Remove air bubbles by sliding rubber spatula between glass and food; readjust head space to 1/2 inch.

Wipe jar rim with a clean, damp cloth, removing any stickiness.  Center hot lid on jar; apply screw band just until fingertip tight.  Place jar in canner.  Repeat with remaining pears, brandy, and syrup.

Cover canner; return water to a boil and process for 20 minutes at altitudes up to 1,000 feet.  Remove jars.  Cool 24 hours.

Check your jar seals:  if the center of your lid springs back when pressed, your seal is broken and the contents must be refrigerated immediately and used promptly.  If the center remains firm when pressed, your seal is good, and contents can be kept in a cool, dry place for up to a year.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted August 12th, 2011.

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