Allspice Chronicles

Entertain like a Queen, Think Lean and Live Green! A personal collection of recipes,anecdotes,and good old fashioned advice…

Chicken With Tarragon Cream Sauce

by Danica Waters (image courtesy of www.organicsoul.com)


If you are a stranger to cooking with Tarragon, here’s a fantastically foolproof way to get acquainted.   (Trust me:  you’ll be ever so happy you did.)

Called the “King of Herbs” in France, Tarragon is the primary flavoring of many of the sauces that form the foundation of fantastic French cuisine, such as béarnaise, rigavote and tartare.  It contains highly aromatic volatile oils which are unfortunately lost when the herb is dried; therefore, it is best to use Tarragon immediately after cutting from the stem, and after the cooking process to ensure the purity of its flavor.  While some heat will help to release its essence, be sure it is only exposed to heat for a brief period of time.

 

Because it’s best used fresh, Tarragon makes a spectacular addition to any kitchen herb garden; however, it does not perform well when started from seed.  Cultivated by cuttings and root divisions, it makes a spectacular living heirloom gift for family and friends. Got a Harry Potter fanatic on your gift list?  Here’s a tip:  Tarragon used to be referred to as little Dragon Mugwort.  Legend has it that, because of its dragon-like root structure, Tarragon was supposed to cure bites and stings of venomous beasts.  As a matter of fact, in France, Tarragon is called Herbe au Dragon.  Just think:  with a small pot, a Tarragon plant, and a fancy label, you’ll be giving a gift that will excite the imagination as well as the palate!  Score!  Be sure to give your Tarragon full sun and well-drained soil and it will happily enhance your finest potions… uh…recipes for years to come.

F.Y.I, of the two most common varieties (Russian and French), French Tarragon is the most widely used in culinary endeavors, primarily because it is a bit richer in flavor than its cousin, whose inferior flavor tends to the bitter side.  French Tarragon, on the other hand, has a sweet, oh-so-slightly tangy flavor with licorice (anise) overtones; it pairs beautifully with chicken, fish, vegetables, and eggs.  Happily, it happens to be the star of this incredibly easy to make, elegant, and over-the-top delicious recipe.

 

Enjoy!

 

Chicken With Tarragon Cream Sauce

(Serves 4)

 

5 Chicken breast fillets, cut into ½ inch slices and lightly seasoned with white pepper

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 Tbsp fresh chopped fresh French tarragon

1 C cream or half-and-half

1 Tbsp lemon juice

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Prepare chicken breast fillets and lightly season with white pepper.  Heat a large, shallow frying pan over high heat, add the oil, and stir to coat the pan.  Add the chicken, in batches, and cook each batch over medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until chicken slices are golden brown.

 

When all the chicken is cooked, return all of it to the pan and stir in the chopped tarragon.

 

Add the cream and bring to the boil; boil for three minutes or until sauce is slightly thickened.  Add the lemon juice and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.  Serve with buttered egg noodles and a crisp salad.

Share on Facebook
[`tweetmeme` not found]
Share on StumbleUpon
Post to Google Buzz
Bookmark this on Delicious
Bookmark this on Yahoo Bookmark
Bookmark this on Digg
Share on reddit

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in Allspice Chronicles and Chicken and Cuisines and Danica Waters and Dinner and Entrees and French and Meal Time and Meats and Pasta by danica on October 19th, 2011 at 1:28 pm.

Add a comment

No Replies

Feel free to leave a reply using the form below!


Leave a Reply